Ask the Diamond Expert – Farooq Khan

diamond Expert
Ask the Diamond Expert – Farooq Khan

Clarity

When we speak of a diamond’s clarity, we are referring to the presence of identifying characteristics on (blemishes) and within (inclusions) the stone.

If you think about the incredible amount of pressure it takes to create a diamond and the fact that natural diamonds are not grown in a sterile laboratory, it’s no surprise that most diamonds have flaws.

Basically there are two types of flaws: inclusions and blemishes. Inclusions refer to internal flaws and blemishes refer to surface flaws. However, in the diamond grades listed below, you’ll note that none of the grades include the term “blemish” — for the purposes of grading diamonds, all flaws are called “inclusions.”

Inclusions include flaws such as air bubbles, cracks, and non-diamond minerals found in the diamond. Blemishes include scratches, pits, and chips. Some blemishes occur during the cutting processes (most often at the girdle). Diamonds with no or few inclusions and blemishes are more highly valued than those with less clarity because they are rarer.

Which Clarity Grade Should I Choose?

While Flawless diamonds are the rarest, a diamond does not have to be flawless to be stunning.

In fact, until you drop to the “I” grade, a diamond’s clarity grade has an impact on the diamond’s value, not on the unmagnified diamond’s appearance.

Diamonds with VVS and VS grades are excellent choices for both value and appearance.

More affordable (and still a great choice) are those diamonds which gemologists call “eye-clean” – diamonds with no inclusions visible to the naked eye. These diamonds are SI1 and SI2 and unless the recipient carries a 10X loupe (a strong jewellery magnifying glass), she won’t see the inclusions.

As to I1-I3? Maybe when there’s a diamond grade that’s defined as “you can see the flaws just by looking at the diamond,” nothing more needs to be said.

Okay, to be “fair” to I1-I3 — not everyone notices visible flaws in a diamond. And not all “visible” flaws are “equally” visible — think about the difference between dripping mustard on a starched white dress shirt and dripping mustard on a brightly-colored Hawaiian shirt (not that we think you have a lot of mustard dripping experience). Obviously, one shows up a lot more than the other — visible diamond flaws are like that.

But if you choose to buy an I1-I3 diamond (which we don’t really recommend), know that some people will look at it and immediately see the flaws — and not just experienced jewellers.